Homework

At Lakey lane we see homework as an important tool to help children’s learning.

Homework takes many different forms.  For example it can include:

  • Finding out the answer to a question(s) linked to the current area of study
  • Doing some research                                    “                  “                  “
  • Carrying out an exercise to reinforce work covered in class
  • Learning spellings, tables or number facts
  • Learning the meaning of key vocabulary- including pre-learning in advance of a new topic
  • Reading or responding to a text

Homework should be matched to the children’s level of ability so that it should be able to be completed independently.  If a child is finding homework too challenging parents should be encouraged to discuss this with the classteacher.

Teachers will take into account EAL issues when setting homework eg the level of English included in the instructions for a task should be considered before a piece of homework is set.

The days on which homework is set and collected in should be known by the children and shared with parents through the termly newsletter. 

 

Homework per phase:

 

Phase 1:  Nursery and reception:

Daily/ ongoing

Reading books (parents are strongly encouraged to read a comment in their child’s reading diary when they hear their child read or share a book with them)

Phonics- Sounds book

Tricky words

Occasional/ as and when relevant

Maths- learning to recognise numbers, count in 2s etc

Topic- finding the answer to a given question/ research

Fine motor skills practice

 

Phase 2:  Year 1 and 2:

Daily/ ongoing

Reading (parents are strongly encouraged to read a comment in their child’s reading diary when they hear their child read or share a book with them)

Tricky words for Y1

Weekly

Spellings (Y1 usually start this during the second half of the autumn term)

Tables for Y2

Handwriting pattern of the week

Occasional/ as and when relevant

Topic- finding the answer to a given question/ research

 

Key Stage 2

When homework has not been completed this should carry a consequence as the expectation is that it will be done.  On a first occasion this will be a warning. If there is a second occasion the teacher may choose to keep the child in at playtime to complete the task.  Parents should also be told.  For “persistent offenders” the phase leader and/or AHT/DHT/HT will also become involved.

 

Phase 3:  Year 3 and 4:

Daily/ ongoing

Reading/ responding to texts.  Children are asked to complete a book review when they finish a text.  Once they complete 10 reviews their name is entered into the dip to select the termly winners who visit a book shop to choose a book of their choice as a prize.

Weekly

English-Spellings

Maths-Tables

Alternate weeks- numeracy or writing homework                      

Occasional/ as and when relevant

Topic- finding the answer to a given question/ research

 

Phase 4:  Year 5 and 6:

Daily/ ongoing

Reading/ responding to texts- daily 10-15 minutes

Weekly

Spellings

Tables

English- Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar focus                      

Maths                            

Science- year 6

Occasional/ as and when relevant

Topic- finding the answer to a given question/ research

 

Government recommended time for homework 
In 2012 the Education Secretary at that time scrapped the existing guidelines for the amount of homework that should be set for children of different ages saying that “head teachers were now responsible for determining the amount of homework that their children are set.”  “We trust head teachers to set the homework policy for their school.  They know their pupils best and should be free to make decisions without having to adhere to unnecessary bureaucratic guidance.”